Julia Child introduced whisks (or whips, as she called them) to American kitchens in the 1960s, and we've been enamored ever since. They're multi-tasking utensils that can aerate, emulsify, deglaze, and mix. Yet anyone who's shopped for a whisk recently knows that they come in an overwhelming array of designs these days. In this exclusive slideshow, Gourmet demystifies the wide world of whisks.
True to its name, this whisk loops arranged in a flat pattern so that they cover the large surface of shallow skillets or roasting pans—the kind in which roux, pan sauces, and gravies are often prepared. (Some cooks, however, prefer the flat whisk for this sort of job.) The flat whisk can quickly incorporate egg yolks into sugar for pastry creams and custard, and flour into butter for roux. The wires blend the ingredients by pulling them in from all sides into the center.
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