Julia Child introduced whisks (or whips, as she called them) to American kitchens in the 1960s, and we've been enamored ever since. They're multi-tasking utensils that can aerate, emulsify, deglaze, and mix. Yet anyone who's shopped for a whisk recently knows that they come in an overwhelming array of designs these days. In this exclusive slideshow, Gourmet demystifies the wide world of whisks.
With its straight tines this one doesn't look much like a whisk, yet it does a great job on beurre blancs, roux, and mayonnaise. The balls at the end of the tines swing both from side to side and in circles to both whisk and swirl, and the shape allows you to get in the corners of a pot and bowl. Another plus: it's easy to clean, since there's no place for food to get stuck. We particularly liked the one with the silicone-covered balls because it eliminates the noise the all-steel ones make.
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