Julia Child introduced whisks (or whips, as she called them) to American kitchens in the 1960s, and we've been enamored ever since. They're multi-tasking utensils that can aerate, emulsify, deglaze, and mix. Yet anyone who's shopped for a whisk recently knows that they come in an overwhelming array of designs these days. In this exclusive slideshow, Gourmet demystifies the wide world of whisks.
If most of your pots and pans are cast-iron or have non-stick coatings this is the whisk to own: it won't scratch the surfaces.  And at 10.5 inches it falls between the balloon and the French whisk.
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