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1950s Archive

Classes in Classic Cuisine

Spring Vegetables

continued (page 3 of 4)

Cut sliced bread in 1 ½ inch roundor diamond-shaped croutons, brush the croutons with beaten egg yolk and bake them in the oven or under the broiler until the egg has set. Arrange the croutons in a circle around the vegetables.

Carottes Vichy (Glazed Carrots)

Put in a saucepan 2 cups carrots, scraped and cut into very thin slices. Add 2 tablespoons butter, I tablespoon sugar, ½ cup water and, if desired, a very little salt. Bring the liquid to a boil, cover the pan and simmer the vegetables until all the water has cooked away. Uncover the pan and continue to cook the carrots, shaking the pan, until they are lightly glazed by the butter and sugar remaining in the pan. Sprinkle them generously with chopped parsley.

In France, we like to cook spinach in a large quantity of boiling salted water, adding the spinach to the pot little by little so that the boiling never stops. You may like to try my method as a change from the usual American practice of cooking spinach in the water that clings to the leaves after washing.

Epinards en Branches (Spinach)

Wash 3 pounds very young, tender spinach thoroughly in several waters, lifting it out of the basin so that the sand remains on the bottom. Cook the spinach rapidly in 1 quart boiling water with ½ teaspoon salt for 6 to 8 minutes. Turn the spinach into a colander or a sieve to drain, and press our as much water as possible. Return the spinach to the pan and shake it over the heat until all the surplus water cooks away. Serve with melted butter or meat gravy.

Epinards à la Crème (Creamed Spinach)

Clean very thoroughly 3 pounds spinach and cook it in 1 quart boiling water with ½ teaspoon salt for 8 to 10 minutes. Drain, pressing out as much water as possible. Chop the spinach very finely, or force it through a coarse sieve. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan. add 2 teaspoons flour and cook the roux until it begins to turn golden. Stir in the spinach and cook it for a few minutes until it is quite dry. Season with ½ teaspoon salt and, if desired. a grating of nutmeg. Stir in ½ cup rich milk or cream, bring the mixture to a boil and cook it for a few minutes longer. Garnish with small triangles of bread browned in butter, or with quarters of hard-cooked egg.

Souffle d'Epinards au Jamhon (Spinach and Ham Soufflé)

Drain 2 pounds cooked spinach in a colander and blanch it by running cold water through it. Drain it again, squeezing out as much water as possible, then chop it very finely or rub it through a coarse sieve. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a saucepan, add the spinach and cook it over high heat, stirring constantly until all the water has cooked away. Add 1 ½ tablespoons Hour, a little salt and pepper, and a grating of nutmeg. Stir well, add ½ cup boiling chicken stock or hot milk and mix thoroughly. Bring the liquid to a boil, cover the pan and cook the spinach for 10 minutes.

Remove the pan from the heat and add A tablespoons grated Parmesan, ½ cup lean Virginia ham cut in very small dice, 1 tablespoon butter and 3 beaten egg yolks. Beat the mixture thoroughly and fold in 4 stiffly beaten egg whites. Turn the mixture into a buttered souffle mold or baking dish, round the surface into a dome shape and sprinkle it with a little grated Parmesan and a little melted butter. Bake the souffle in a moderate oven (350° to 375° F.) for 25 to 30 minutes, or until it is well puffed and lightly browned.

Turban d'Epinards {Spinach Ring)

Drain 3 pounds cooked spinach well, chop it finely and rub it through a coarse sieve. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in a saucepan, add 1 tablespoon Hour and cook the roux until it begins to brown, Mix in the spinach and cook it until all the moisture cooks away. Season with salt and a grating of nutmeg. Add 1 large, or 2 small eggs, well beaten. Turn the mixture into a ring mold, set the mold in a pan of boiling water and bake it in a moderate oven (350° to 375 F.) for 20 to 25 minutes. Unmold the ring on a serving dish and fill the center with creamed mushrooms, creamed carrots or any other creamed vegetable.

Haricots Verts Lyonnaise (Green Beans Lyonnaise)

Wash and cut the ends from 1 ½ pounds young green beans and cut them in 1-inch lengths, or slice each bean down the center lengthwise and then across the center to make 4 pieces. If the beans are very small and young. leave (hem whole. Cook the beans in 1 quart boiling water with 1 teaspoon salt for 20 minutes, or until they arc just tender, and drain them. Melt 3 tablespoons butter in a saucepan, add 1 medium onion, finely chopped, and cook the onion until it begins to take on color. Add the beans and shake the pan over the heat to mix the vegetables with the butter and onions. Correct the seasoning with salt and sprinkle the beans with finely chopped parsley.

Haricots Verts Paysanne (Green Beans Country Style)

Prepare 1 ½ pounds young green beans as directed above. Parboil ½ cup diced salt pork or bacon in water to cover for 5 minutes, and drain it. Melt 2 tablespoons butter in a saucepan, add the pork dice and brown them lightly. Remove and reserve the dice. To the fat in the pan add 2 onions, chopped. and brown them lightly. Add 4 tomatoes, peeled, seeded and chopped. 2 potatoes cut in large dice, ¾ teaspoon salt, a little pepper, the pork dice and the green beans. Add ½ cup water, bring the liquid to a boil, cover the pan and cook the mixture slowly for about 30 minutes, or until the vegetables arc tender.

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